Sweater Resolutions

A fresh new year, full of yarn and knitting! This makes me very happy.

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This week’s article gives resources for trying colorwork, different sock constructions, entrelac, traditional techniques, new and innovative techniques, cables, charts and dyeing your own yarn. I was lucky enough to have resolutions shared by some wonderful designers, including Susan B. Anderson, Stephannie Tallent, Daniel Yuhas, Alex Tinsley, Sarah Wilson, Elizabeth Morrison, podcast host Maria MN, video maker Johnny Vasquez, Elizabeth Green Musselman and Lee Meredith.

My Resolution

I have one big goal this year; to give myself an education in knitting sweaters. Because I like to try on as I go, and have a fear of knitting a bunch of pieces that make a sweater way too big (or more likely, too small) for me, I’m going to focus on seamless sweaters. First, pullovers, then cardigans.

I love knitting accessories, and as a busy mom, business owner and Healthy Snack Team leader for the kids’ school, have shied away from sweaters as too time consuming. But I’m too stubborn to buy myself store sweaters, since the knitter in me always thinks she could do it better (at least with better yarn!). Amy has knitted herself a whole wardrobe of sweaters. Susie Anderson has been a big inspiration, wearing her favorite handknit sweaters every time I see her. And the fact is, I’m getting cold. Especially now that I spend much of the day dyeing yarn in my basement studio, it’s chilly! So sweaters it is.

I’ve been having fun trolling through Ravelry and noting my favorite patterns to try, and have a pretty good queue lined up. I’m not under the delusion that I’ll finish all of these this year, but want to start with the very simplest raglan sweater and move into more details over time.

Look out, sweaters, here I come!

There are so many appealing sweaters on Ravelry, but here are my Top 13 for 13 picks….

1. Already started: Sunday Brunch Sweater, by Mishellee Zaharis. It looks like a very simple raglan top-down knitted with worsted weight yarn and larger needles for drape.


This coral color is the first skein of my red Sweater’s Worth of yarn.

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2. Oatmeal Pullover, by Jane Richmond. Simple raglan construction in chunky yarn, should be a relatively quick knit!

3. Mondo Cable Pulli, by Bonne Marie Burns. Who doesn’t love this pattern?

4.Tang, by Wendy Bernard. A nice, cozy turtleneck.

5.Kaleidoscope Yoke, by Katie Himmelberg. You know I’ve got to try this in my own gradient yarn!

6. Bayside Pullover, by Hannah Fettig, to get those cables going. Love that detail.

7.Shellseeker, by Heidi Kirrmaier; I can’t resist both stripes and pockets!

8. Elise, by Stephannie Tallent. Loved this since we first published it.

9. Gathered Blouse , by Katya Frankel.

10. Wetwang, by Ann Kingstone. A big fan of this designer, and I love the subdued yet stylish colorwork on  this one.

11. Snowflake, by TinCanKnits

12. Hillcrest Coat, by Amy Miller. A fellow Wisconsinite! I could see wearing this sweater every single cold day.

13: From this Day Forward by Ashley Knowlton. An elegant spring/summer sweater. This one is in fingering, so a stretch for me, but would be so lovely when finished.

Of course, as a designer, there’s always deadline knitting, but I’ve set myself a goal of no less than 7 sweater rounds a day. That’s enough to make some progress, but not so much that it’s un-do-able in a deadline crunch. The main goal is to keep knitting something every day and make sure that my own sweaters don’t get put on the back burner.

5 thoughts on “Sweater Resolutions

  1. Your sweater dilemmas sound very similar to mine. I know I can knit one, but it’s too big a project to carry around when I am hanging out in the car waiting for the kids.
    There is always an excuse, but there is never the sweater I need, that I can make.
    I love the sweater resolutions, but the procrastinator in me says, maybe next year!

  2. You seriously added to my queue, Jaala. I especially like your first choice. It has lovely shaping and will be perfect with leggings.

    • Good question! I actually just usually wear dark colors, because the dyes are usually pretty well-behaved and don’t jump out of the pot too much, but if I was wearing a handknit sweater, I would definitely have to cover it up.

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